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8.15.2009

Challenge Site: "Good Grief" challenge blog

I came upon this blog today and nearly applauded out loud at my computer screen.
There are many reasons why we scrapbook. To celebrate life's joys and triumphs.
But this site is dedicated to scrapping the hard times.



GOOD GRIEF is run by a team who have each lost a loved one within the past year and have come together to share their experiences and to help you scrap the not-so-happy parts of life.

Sure, this site might not be for everybody.
But for those who want to try to cope, mourn and heal through scrapping it seems like it will prove to be a very valuable resource.

There first challenge has posted today (complete with a prize sponsor) and I am excited to follow this blog and see how their concept develops. Go and check it out! http://www.goodgriefblog.com/

What do YOU think? Do you think documenting loss is an important part of scrapping? Or do you think scrapping is for celebrations? Have you scrapped a tragedy before and if so...did you feel it was therapeutic?

15 comments:

NanaBeth said...

I think this is fantastic. I'll be visiting the site often. I have had some painful losses I need to scrap for a long time now.
While not quite what you asked about, I used my digital scrapping skills to make a memorial ad for my son' senior year book. His best friend committed suicide when he was 16. I than scanned the memorial and superimposed it on a scan of the yearbook. I gave framed 8x10's to his family-they loved it. I think it helped them to know he was still loved and remembered.

The Lonely Scrapbooker said...

I've scrapped about tough-ish times. I've also done three pages over the years of friends who've passed on--scanned or pasted down the memorial service programme on the page, and included my own photos of the person, as well as a few thoughts of my own on their passing.I've been fortunate enough so far to not have a loss super close to me to think about should I scrap it or not. I think I would, but who knows?

Vicki said...

I think it's a wonderful idea. I lost my Dad this past spring and plan on joining in the challenges. I believe it will help tremendously. I had so many thoughts during his funeral and want to make sure I get them down. Thanks for sharing the site.

Tamikko said...

It's been a 1 1/2 yrs since we lost my father-in-law and I've been putting off doing the pages I want to do. I've found it really hard to do because I want it to be 'right' and really 'perfect', so, of course, I haven't done anything yet :(
I think this site is going to be a lot of help. Thanks for passing it on :)

Stephanie said...

I think scrapping is whatever you want it to be and I think this is a great idea to give one a little direction if uncertainty prevails in how to do so when it is about the loss of someone precious.

Melissa said...

I think this is great! And not only for those who have lost someone, but also for scrapbooking very difficult times in your life. One of my daughters has been sick and hospitalized several times and almost lost her life to an intestinal bleed. I took pictures during these times and they are extremely difficult to scrapbook. I think this will be a GREAT help to those dealing with those difficult emotions.

Mary said...

I definitely think scrapping about loss is important and therapeutic. I have scrapped about grandparent's funerals and even sad moments in my life and it's an emotional release to leave it on paper and allows you to go back and remember. I know my other relatives have appreciated the page and it can become almost a tribute to the person.

KariAnnS said...

I think it's important to scrap about the tough things as well as the good things. I'm 16 weeks pregnant and lost my job last Monday. I already scrapped about it and it really helped me sort through the emotions.

Veronica said...

I've always wanted to scrap about such subjects, for I lost my mother at a young age and my inlaws have both past being such a great presence in my children's lives as grandparents. Not knowing where to begin, it is great that you have shared this blog. I have bookmarked it and will go often. Thank you.

Heather said...

I have not scrapped any of the hard stuff I'm just not there yet. I have some serious things that need to be told and remembered. I just don't know how to put them down, do them justice and be okay with them.

I'll be checking this site for ideas.

scrapbookobsession said...

Thanks for the tip, Emilie (with an "ie", ha). I did a blog post about Good Grief, and entered their first challenge.
~Erika

jill said...

I think scrapping the hard stuff is exactly that hard. It isn't cute and fun and doesn't have a theme. You want to do the memory justice, give the right amount of honor, tell the whole story. You may not want to remember bad memories but they build your character, teach you something. If it happened in your life you can't just delete it by not scrapping it. You have to embrace it.

Mary F said...

I think it's a great idea and am surprised someone hasn't done this before now. I still can't find myself scrapping about my cousin who took his own life a few years ago and maybe this site will help me find a way to do so

Lynette said...

Every person scraps what is important to them. My uncle died a year ago and I did a page honoring his memory. No one evr should feel obligated to scrap something. It ceases to be a pleasure then.

Jen said...

From someone who is currently scrapping in the midst of grief, I can say that it is the most healing thing I have done. As of right now I only have one page posted on my blog, others are coming and others won't be shared....But I think scrapping grief is not dwelling on the hard parts but celebrating lessons learned from them and life itself..the everyday and the abnormal...what ever they may be.

I am sure we can all say there are things in our lives that have made us who we are and some we would change if we could, others we would do all over again...but we know we have come out on the other side a better and more complete person. Those things should be recorded and remembered.